Post 38:
June Little House Newsletter

Post 38: June Little House Newsletter

From Anne —

It’s 1984.  Young Anne is 14, heading into sophomore year in high school, and has started reading Seventeen Magazine. You can tell by the way I mimic its perky, season-specific copywriting. That’s the spirit of the Little House Newsletter: a testing ground for my magazine journalism career that didn’t totally happen.

 

To read, print out or download the newsletter, click here.

You can also tell I am the daughter of a librarian. Thirty years before Google, all of the information nuggets in the Little House Newsletter came from either:

1) A paperback biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder with a super cheesy cover:

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2) back issues of People magazine from my mom’s library.

I remember using a huge paperweight of a book called the Readers Index to identify any article about anything related to Gilbert, Landon or Grassle. And I remember ordering that pulp biography by Donald Zochert (above) and counting the days ’til it came.

So the issue is always punchy mix of LHOP show and books. I bet Patrick Laborteaux (“Andy Garvey”) had no clue who Carrie Ingalls Swanzey (herself a newspaperwoman) was. But there they are, commingled in my little timeline in purple, top left.

My editorial choices in this dense little issue of Little House Newsletter mirror my concerns at this age: love, madness, time, and Mattel commercials.  My guilt at getting the issue out late is also noted twice!
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From Tracy –

What Young Anne created here would later have a name — a zine. And even in this webby age the counterculture still produces tons of them. Here’s a selection from the shelves of the famous Powell’s Books here in Portland which carries at least 30 of them at any given time:

Powell's Books Portland Zines Shelves

Now for those of you who don’t remember a time before personal computers and the web, just imagine the time it would take to create this zine. Yes photocopiers existed and Anne had the awesome power of a librarian mother at her disposal. But she wanted each of the sections to be in a different color. And color photocopiers or printers were definitely not available to the general public. So that meant creating each one by hand. I think Anne had about four or five devoted followers to her newsletter. So we’re talking a lot of work. But that’s her. A woman who is a perfectionist and loves the details.

Here’s some irony. This time I’m the one apologizing for the lateness of the Little House Newsletter. Anne was right on time this go around. (Sorry Anne!)

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